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This resource contains guidance to help Singapore businesses to develop and implement anti-corruption systems by following four key steps: ‘pledge’, ‘assess’, ‘control and communicate’ and ‘track’. The guidance also contains case studies, links to additional resources and sample versions of anti-corruption policies, codes of conduct, declaration forms for gifts and entertainment and conflicts of interest, and a risk assessment checklist.

Authorities in the United Kingdom (UK) can investigate and prosecute foreign bribery that took place outside of the UK. This includes where UK citizens are involved, if some of the conduct occurred in the UK or for foreign companies that 'carry out business or part of a business', or are listed in the UK. This portal puts you in touch with the correct authorities in the UK if you wish to report foreign bribery. An A-Z of company cases is included.

United States (US) authorities investigate and prosecute foreign bribery that takes place outside of the US, including where US citizens are involved, where payments are in US dollars and where companies are 'issuers' in US capital markets. This policy sets out the US Department of Justice's policy for giving significant discounts in penalty and circumstances in which authorities may not prosecute. Scroll down to view.

Businesses that engage in commercial activity with overseas entities involved in serious corruption or other situations of international concern should be aware of obligations arising under Australia’s sanctions laws. Sanctions impose restrictions on activities that relate to particular countries, goods, services, or entities. The Australian Sanctions Office provides information about compliance with Australia’s sanctions laws and how to apply for sanctions permits.

Exporters need to be aware of the risks of bribery and corruption in international transactions and requirements to comply with laws in multiple jurisdictions. Bribery committed outside Australia can be captured under Australian laws and have serious consequences. Export Finance Australia provides useful links to assist exporters in understanding their obligations to comply with relevant laws against bribery and corruption. 

A practical sector specific fact sheet on business integrity that can be used for training. Demonstrates the value of effective systems and provides steps to detect, prevent and manage corruption risks and enhance transparency among company partners. Outlines the benefits to business and consequences for a mining company of being associated with corruption.

The Austrade 'Monitoring and Review' fact sheet helps businesses to understand what internal and external mechanisms can be used to assess the effectiveness of their bribery prevention policies and procedures. Ensure your organisation has adequate measures in place to meet stakeholder expectations and comply with regulatory frameworks. Know what records should be kept and when policies and procedures may need to be adjusted.

Create a compliance program that seeks to prevent and address bribery and corruption with this guide. It includes country risk reports that outline risks associated when engaging with state-owned enterprises. Also included are key actions to take when building a compliance program, a six-step process for conducting third party due diligence, sample policies, training procedures, risk assessment templates and due diligence tools.

These voluntary rules from the International Chamber of Commerce offer business a method of self-regulation to comply with anti-corruption initiatives at the international level. The rules promote high standards of integrity in business transactions and provide an appropriate basis for resisting attempts at extortion or solicitation of bribes. Available in English, French, Spanish and Turkish.

This article identifies key global impacts of corruption, including its effect on healthcare outcomes, education and on women, children and the world's poor. It explains how aligning anti-corruption strategies with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, can support business to promote the five pillars of sustainable development: people, planet, prosperity, peace, and partnerships. 

A resource to help develop an understanding of how internal reporting mechanisms can strengthen a business. Provides guidance on the components required for a business to have effective reporting mechanisms and early detection. Covers the benefits of whistleblower reporting mechanisms and having employees speak up about legal or ethical misconduct. 

Foreign bribery results in an inefficient allocation of resources and economic distortions. It is also a threat to democracy, corrosive of good governance and an impediment to economic development. This fact sheet provides information about the consequences for individuals and companies who bribe or attempt to bribe and the broader, far-reaching effects of foreign bribery on democratic institutions and governmental stability.

In 2015 Standard Bank PLC entered into a deferred prosecution agreement with the Serious Fraud Office in the United Kingdom to pay penalties of over US$25 million and US$7 million of compensation in connection with its role in an equity raising in Tanzania. The case highlights the risks of using agents to help win government contracts.

Protect your organisation by putting in place clear policies and procedures that prohibit the offer, giving or receipt of gifts, hospitality or expenses where they could influence, or be reasonably perceived to influence, improper outcomes of business transactions. This resource also offers guidance on policy considerations and procedures such as record keeping. It forms part of Austrade’s suite of anti-bribery materials.

This video highlights research undertaken by Transparency International with 47, 000 citizens from 35 African countries who shared their lived experience of paying a bribe for basic services. It found that paying bribes is far too common, is getting worse and that the poorest in society are twice as likely to have to pay a bribe.