International Resources


Find out how international co-operation on bribery and corruption is supporting countries and business to address the problem of bribery.

Locate international resources – including conventions, standards, principles and good practice guidance – that promote a culture of integrity and responsible business. This resource collection includes key guidance from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the United Nations and Transparency International on the prevention of foreign bribery.

Resources from International Organisations

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The United Nations Convention Against Corruption is a legally binding universal anti-corruption instrument. It covers five main areas: preventive measures, criminalisation and law enforcement, international cooperation, asset recovery, and technical assistance and information exchange. The prevention chapter is relevant to both public and private sectors. Published in English, Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian and Spanish.

The Australian National Contact Point (AusNCP) is responsible for promoting the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises and to contribute to the resolution of issues relating to their implementation when cases against a company are raised. The complaint mechanism helps parties resolve conflicts. The website provides useful information on how to submit a complaint, track a case and view a closed complaint.

This resource offers a road map for better corporate practice on anti-corruption disclosures. It demonstrates the business case for advancing corporate governance and transparency. Direction is provided for disclosure across five high risk areas. It responds to some of the legal challenges that might inhibit a business from disclosing information.

Launched in 2021, this interactive tools is designed for a diversity of small and medium sized enterprises. The tool supports businesses to implement corruption risk assessments throughout global supply chains. It offers a good first step for understanding what actions can be taken to improve business corruption risk assessments and provides a list of information sources to do so.

Parties to the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention, including Australia, are required to criminalise bribery of foreign public officials in international business transactions. This fact sheet provides short explanations of the OECD, the Anti‑Bribery Convention, how the Convention is monitored and background to Australia’s enforcement of the Convention.

The OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions is a legally binding instrument that criminalises bribery of foreign public officials in international business transactions. The Convention was strengthened by the 2009 Anti-Bribery Recommendation which established additional measures to prevent, detect and investigate foreign bribery. Published in five languages.

This resource provides interactive guidance on anti-bribery and corruption good practice for companies operating in the United Kingdom and overseas. It includes practical guidance on conducting risk assessment and third party due diligence, implementing ABC training and identifying high risk areas. It also provides country-by-country summaries of anti-bribery laws to assist companies operating abroad.

What are the incentives for a company to refrain from bribery and implement sound anti-corruption measures? This short guide provides some answers.

Practical guidance for developing anti-bribery programs that suit the size and structure of small and medium enterprises. Includes clear steps on how to develop and implement an anti-bribery program. It recognises the resource constraints of smaller businesses and provides clear examples of how to assess bribery issues. Learn about internal communication, controls and monitoring.

The OECD Anti-Corruption and Integrity Hub aims to strengthen our collective impact by providing a point of reference to learn, connect, and act. Access current anti-corruption and integrity news, events and recordings of past webinars, case studies, and links to global networks and initiatives in which you can get involved.

These guidelines provide non-binding principles and standards for responsible business conduct in a global context, consistent with local laws and international standards. Promoted by the Australian Government, these guidelines support business to know how to act responsibly in the areas of anti-corruption, human rights, disclosure, employment and industrial relations, environment, competition and taxation. Published in 19 languages, including English.

Establish a culture of integrity in your business. The Ten Principles of the United Nations Global Compact can be incorporated into your business’ strategies, policies and procedures as a foundation for long-term success that aligns with responsible business conduct. These principles promote corporate sustainability by encouraging business to meet fundamental responsibilities in the areas of anti-corruption, human rights, labour and environment.

Explore how an anti-bribery management system might support your business to comply with international and domestic laws and expectations governing bribery and corruption. The ISO 37001 Anti-Bribery Management System sets out the requirements and guidance for establishing, implementing, maintaining and improving an anti-bribery management system. Applicable to organisations of varying sizes from different sectors.

These voluntary rules from the International Chamber of Commerce offer business a method of self-regulation to comply with anti-corruption initiatives at the international level. The rules promote high standards of integrity in business transactions and provide an appropriate basis for resisting attempts at extortion or solicitation of bribes. Available in English, French, Spanish and Turkish.

This video highlights research undertaken by Transparency International with 47, 000 citizens from 35 African countries who shared their lived experience of paying a bribe for basic services. It found that paying bribes is far too common, is getting worse and that the poorest in society are twice as likely to have to pay a bribe.