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The Partnering Against Corruption Initiative (PACI) is a leading business voice on anti-corruption and transparency. This CEO-led platform is founded on the principles of public-private cooperation, responsible leadership and technological advancement. This website offers background information on how business leaders can take part in PACI, which currently has around 90 signatories from different sectors.

Liability for bribery and corruption can arise under multiple jurisdictions both inside and outside Australia. In Australia, individuals and corporations can be liable for a range of state and territory offences including offences that apply to conduct in the private sector. For example, sections 356 and 357 of the ACT Criminal Code contain offences for bribery and corrupting benefits.

Liability for bribery and corruption can arise under multiple jurisdictions both inside and outside Australia. In Australia, individuals and corporations can be liable for a range of state and territory offences including offences that apply to conduct in the private sector. For example, section 176 of the Victorian Crimes Act contains offences for secret commissions.

This resource will support businesses to understand and implement risk-based due diligence as recommended by the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises – a key international standard on responsible business conduct. The guidance describes the due diligence process using six key steps and suggests practical actions business can take. Helpful tips and detailed explanations are also provided, supported by examples.

Transparency International defines whistleblowing as "Making a disclosure in the public interest by an employee, director or external person, in an attempt to reveal neglect or abuses within the activities of an organisation, government body or company (or one of its business partners) that threaten public interest, its integrity and reputation." Find other definitions for key bribery and corruption terms in Transparency International's Corruption A-Z.

Filed under Whistleblowing Detect

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Geared towards the banking sector, this briefing paper offers guidance from global experts on how to develop effective grievance mechanisms. It proposes 10 straightforward recommendations, which can be applied to other sectors. This resource explains the United Nations Guiding Principles effectiveness criteria for grievance mechanisms and applies these to case studies. It offers justification for why SMEs in high risk jurisdictions and sectors would benefit from implementing an operational-level grievance mechanism.

Liability for bribery and corruption can arise under multiple jurisdictions both inside and outside Australia. In Australia, individuals and corporations can be liable for a range of state and territory offences including offences that apply to conduct in the private sector. For example, sections 442B and 442BA of the Queensland Criminal Code contain offences for secret commissions.

This toolkit offers a step by step guide on how to design and implement a grievance mechanism. It explains the purpose of having a grievance mechanism, including why this is a good business investment, issues to consider when establishing a grievance mechanism, how to build and operate an effective mechanism, and how to use feedback to improve a mechanism. This resource includes links to other useful tools.

Filed under Remediation Address

As type Web

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Liability for bribery and corruption can arise under multiple jurisdictions both inside and outside Australia. In Australia, individuals and corporations can be liable for a range of state and territory offences including offences that apply to conduct in the private sector. For example, section 150 of the South Australian Criminal Law Consolidation Act contains an offence for bribery of a fiduciary.

Liability for bribery and corruption can arise under multiple jurisdictions both inside and outside Australia. In Australia, individuals and corporations can be liable for a range of state and territory offences including offences that apply to conduct in the private sector. For example, sections 529 and 530 of the Western Australian Criminal Code contain offences for corrupt rewards.

Liability for bribery and corruption can arise under multiple jurisdictions both inside and outside Australia. In Australia, individuals and corporations can be liable for a range of state and territory offences including offences that apply to conduct in the private sector. For example, section 266 of the Tasmanian Criminal Code contains secret commissions offences for corruption in relation to business.

This resource unpacks the key role played by whistleblowers in identifying instances of foreign bribery. Approaches to encouraging whistleblowers to report suspected instances of bribery to law enforcement are explored, including ensuring effective legal protection from reprisals. Case studies of the various approaches are provided from around the world to offer practical examples of the recommendations in action.

In 2016, Rolls Royce agreed to pay a fine of over £500 million in a deferred prosecution agreement relating to bribery in China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nigeria, Russia and Thailand. Rolls Royce received significant discounts in penalties for cooperating with the Serious Fraud Office in the investigation and implementing strong anti-bribery policies and procedures after the misconduct was uncovered.

Liability for bribery and corruption can arise under multiple jurisdictions both inside and outside Australia. In Australia, individuals and corporations can be liable for a range of state and territory offences including offences that apply to conduct in the private sector. For example, section 236 of the Northern Territory Criminal Code contains offences for secret commissions.

In January 2020, Airbus entered into a deferred prosecution agreement (DPA) which included a fine of €991m in the United Kingdom (UK), as part of a total €3.6bn settlement across France, the UK and the United States for five counts of failure to prevent bribery. The conduct took place across Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Indonesia, Taiwan and Ghana between 2011 and 2015.